Selectivedating com

The company’s algorithm recommends which applicants the company should add to the site, then employees review profiles to make sure they fit the bill.Daters connect their Facebook and Linked In profiles to ensure they aren’t matched with coworkers or acquaintances, then select their preferences for age, height, gender, distance, ethnicity, education and religion. She said getting those questions out of the way paves the way for more fun conversations. Each assignment will include homework, resources and actionable steps. Abiola’s Love School is a weekly empowered Love Lesson, inspirational class and juicy conversation about love, relationships, dating, sex, commitment and self worth.My character nickname was “Miss Picky” because I said that I wanted a man who was “kind, intelligent, compassionate, generous, spiritual, attractive and available.” It was hilarious.Are there women or men out there who are seeking partners who are the opposite: unkind, unintelligent, non-compassionate, selfish, unattractive to them and unavailable?The League has garnered its fair share of bad press claiming it’s elitist, but Bradford said it’s more a way for career-focused daters to quickly find people they’re likely to match with.

Ambition, Bradford says, is the biggest trait The League looks for within its community.

Letting daters see that kind of information upfront helps them choose people they’d actually want to go out with, and also cuts out some of the uncomfortable back-and-forth with a match, said CEO and founder Amanda Bradford.“Sometimes you have to ask awkward questions about height, and things like, ‘Do you have a job? The app planned to go live Wednesday for 2,000 Chicago users — chosen from more than 13,000 daters on the waiting list — and will add users each week on a rolling basis.

Of the 2,000 members, 9 percent have an MBA, 5 percent have a law degree, and 3 percent have an M. The top employers in the group are Deloitte, Mc Kinsey & Company and Kraft Foods.

The League, a selective dating app for successful people, launched in San Francisco earlier this year, and a few months ago it launched in New York City.

Stanford graduate Amanda Bradford founded The League and raised .1 million to match up highly motivated and interesting single professionals.

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